Army Cadet vs. 10 Year-Old Gymnast

By 16 Comments 2,135 views

Video description:

We think of our armed forces as the fittest men and women in the world but they can still be surprised by an undiscovered talent! At a fundraiser for the Active Heroes Foundation in North Carolina on September 6, young cadets went up against onlookers in fitness challenges. Kimberly Munley, the US army sergeant who confronted the Fort Hood gunman in November 2009, met a girl who she called her new hero. This little girl was more than a match for one of the cadets at push ups, and she received plenty of cheers for her effort.

According to her mom on FB:

This is my 10 year old daughter Kaylyn. Thank you all for your kind remakes. She trains at Port City Gymnastics and is testing to be on the US Jr. Olympic Nation[al] Team in October. She is truly amazing on the inside and out!

I can’t believe some YouTube commenters are whining and making excuses on behalf of the JROTC cadet over form, type of push-up, body weight….one doofus even challenged, ” I’d like to see who’s beating who if they fight taliban”. For realz?!

Pound for pound, gymnasts are some of the strongest athletes on the planet. And what’s being described as a “proper push-up” with elbows in, I’m pretty sure she, like most gymnasts, do it that way on a regular basis. Elbows in concentrates the workload on the triceps over chest, and it’s one way that gymnasts develop planche strength (leaning further and further forward).

Here’s Brandon Wynn:

Example of planche push-ups:

16 Responses to “Army Cadet vs. 10 Year-Old Gymnast”

  1. 1

    Budvarakbar

    Which one can pick up a 100 pound bag of sand and toss it 5 feet?

    Seriously — the girl is great – good going for her — but that is no bottom line — apples and walnuts!

    In basic I knew a guy who weighed about 120 — two thirds me — he could always max out the physical test at 500 points while the top I ever got was around 410! — Next day after one of these tests that he maxed — we went on 8 mile hike to boonies with full field gear — I ended up carrying more than half his stuff for him for the last 3-4 miles!

  2. 2

    Smorgasbord

    As long as I can pull myself up out of bed, I figure I’m in good enough shape for the rest of the day.

    Many years ago, a professional boxer was going to mimic his young daughter for the day. I think she was around 3. The boxer lasted only a few hours, and he was done.

    Nature has it backwards. The young shouldn’t get all the extra energy. It should be saved for old age, when we will actually NEED it.

  3. 3

    Skook

    author

    I laughed and laughed at the video. (Someone was doing push-ups from his knees.) Once upon a time in a galaxy far, far away, I was a push up champ and chin up champ, one hand two hands, or standing on my hands. In the Marines on Parris Island or in college, with the wrestling team or the football team, it didn’t matter, I was a machine. Now, I am an old man with silly memories, but my son was a gymnast. What a discipline! Controlled strength, with balance and precision movements, my goodness. I have respect for the work that goes into making a gymnast. We don’t get a second chance, but I would have liked to have had the chance to try that sport.

    Thanks Word

  4. 4

    Smorgasbord

    @Skook: #3
    Many years ago I heard of a 90 something year old woman who had arthritis really bad. She decided to work it off with exercise. It worked, and she eventually became a cheerleader. She could do most of the stuff young cheerleaders do. You could become the oldest gymnast alive.

  5. 5

    FAITH7

    That was great! A little fun ‘competition’ never hurt anyone. It builds character!

    A few years ago I decided to go to a really beautiful park where I live, which has an exercise trail with exercise ‘stations’ and you do each exercise posted at each station. One station has parallel bars and I wanted to strengthen my arms. I have to admit it was hard holding my own dead weight up. I was wearing gloves at the time, it was fall and it was chilly.

    I stopped going when it snowed then shortly after I started having ‘trouble’ with my fingers. I thought I was getting early arthritis I really didn’t know what it was. My fingers just kept getting ‘stuck’. Scared the hell out of me!

    I went to a doctor specializing in the hands and found I had… trigger finger. This is actually caused when the tendons in the palms of the hands, just below the fingers have become inflamed and stressed, they don’t functioning properly and they are important to open and close your fingers as in a fist. I could not imagine how this happened. After some thought, and.. how the heck can this happen, I realized it could have been when I was trying to ‘get in shape’ and strengthening my arms by using the parallel bars…Its the only conclusion I could come up with. That was the only thing I was doing at the time… Sheesh!

    I wound up getting painful steroid shots in my fingers for months. Shots helped a lot but it still reoccurs in my ring fingers. So much for trying to ‘get into shape’! Right? and…Sheesh! again!

    Funny, I had no problem doing it in High School – lol

    I will start again in the fall but I think I will bypass those dam bars. lol.

  6. 6

    Wordsmith

    editor

    @Budvarakbar:

    Which one can pick up a 100 pound bag of sand and toss it 5 feet?

    Seriously — the girl is great – good going for her — but that is no bottom line — apples and walnuts!

    In basic I knew a guy who weighed about 120 — two thirds me — he could always max out the physical test at 500 points while the top I ever got was around 410! — Next day after one of these tests that he maxed — we went on 8 mile hike to boonies with full field gear — I ended up carrying more than half his stuff for him for the last 3-4 miles!

    Oh, please! Don’t move the goal posts!

    You’re absolutely right it’s apples and walnuts. So what are we comparing here, fruits or nuts? If they’re comparing fruits, you are essentially bringing up nuts rather than complimenting one or the other on the fruit contest.

    I’ve known gymnasts who never having bench pressed before, end up pressing twice their body weights. What’s being measured in this exercise is which one has the better body-to-strength ratio. If their lives depended upon swarming up a rope the fastest with just their body weight, which one would fare better? My money would be on the 10 yr old girl who’s been training to make the jr. national team. She probably does rope climbs every day.

    Now, if you want to get even more critical as to what’s being measured, when you’re sacrificing quality for quantity and also doing it for speed, it’s not a pure test in push-up strength and muscle endurance. Also to be considered is lever length (who has longer arms and thus, a longer distance to push their body weight- assuming they are going full range of motion?).

    Probably a better test of strength would be slow and controlled push-ups. Have you ever tried doing a sustained chin-up that takes 3o seconds on the way up and 30 seconds on the way down, constant motion? That can be as challenging as cranking out 100 chin-ups in 60 seconds.

    Also, just because someone is great at one particular exercise, of course does not mean they will be great at other tests of strength.

    I’ve known marathon runners who gassed out when put into a boxing ring. Each sport places emphasis on a different kind of conditioning.

    Dan Inosanto- one of my MA teachers- used to tell this story: He and a bunch of martial artists were at a swimming pool party quibbling over which art/style was superior. The Tae Kwon Do guy said his style was the best. The wrestler said grappling wins every time. The golden gloves boxer claimed his sport was superior. A stranger eavesdropping on the conversation piped in, “I can beat you all.” They wanted him to prove it, so he agreed. And he took each one of them on…..in the swimming pool.

    The Tae Kwon Do man could not throw any fancy high kicks to the head; no spinning tornado kicks. He was flailing around and quickly gave up. The wrestler wasn’t too bad, but could not hold his breath long enough to win, and also gave up. The boxer had his head held underwater until he too signaled that he had enough. Afterward, they asked him what martial art he studied. He said he didn’t study martial arts. He played water polo.

    The point is, in his realm, he was king. It’s like the question, which is the superior weapon, a grenade, a knife, or a firearm? It depends on the situation. If you’re fighting an assailant in a phone booth, the grenade probably won’t be your weapon of choice. In close-quarters, the knife is devastating. At long range, a projectile weapon is useful.

    You put a Navy SEAL in UFC match with rules, restrictions, and referee and the MA fighter may come out on top. This is his arena. You put an MA fighter out on the battlefield of urban or jungle warfare with M-16s and anything goes (improvised weapons, biting, eye-gouging, etc.) and the soldier is in his element. The MA fighter is not.

    A good mechanic doesn’t quibble over which tool is superior. He finds which tool in his toolbox is most appropriate and efficient for the task.

    In a push-up contest, there’s no shame in this Army cadet giving props to a 10 yr old girl who, if she really is training for the JO TOPS national team, does push-ups (and then some) on a regular basis and with better form (I doubt her coach allows her to get away with sloppy form and effort in the gym). Asking “Which one can pick up a 100 pound bag of sand and toss it 5 feet?” is like the flip-side of me asking, “Which one can crank out 20 straddle-L press handstands?”

    Btw, I’ve known 6 ft tall male gymnasts who, because they did gymnastics conditioning, were absolute beasts apart from a good strength-to-weight ratio.

  7. 7

    FAITH7

    @Smorgasbord#2 You said –

    “Nature has it backwards. The young shouldn’t get all the extra energy. It should be saved for old age, when we will actually NEED it. “

    I promised myself I would never get old. -lol

  8. 8

    Wordsmith

    editor

    @FAITH7: Hmm….that sounds really strange.

    I love parallel bars.

    Several years ago, I had stopped doing much gymnastics workout (I am a former collegiate gymnast) and noticed when I started back up that the palms of my hands no longer liked the pressure of my body weight on the bars. It was weird at the time. I no longer get that, even when I take long absences from swinging on them.

    These days I do a morning run to the park and there is a set of metal parallel bars out there. I’ll do a few swing to handstands just to prove to myself that I still can.

  9. 10

    Smorgasbord

    @FAITH7: #7

    I promised myself I would never get old. -lol

    I coined a phrase: “You grow old from the top down. Keep the top young, and the rest of the body will follow.” I too decided a long time ago to stay as young as I can. So far it has worked, because when people who want to guess my age, I tell them to add 10 years, and they still guess too young.

    One thing that helped is that most of my jobs involved physical labor of some kind. I’ve retired now, and I don’t exercise much, and the weight is gaining a little each year. I don’t intend to buy bigger clothes. I will HAVE to exercise more.

  10. 11

    FAITH7

    @Wordsmith#8 –
    Wow! Word. If only I ‘could’ do a swing to a handstand…it’s good to challenge yourself and get a ‘win’ isn’t it?

    Yes. Very strange. Only conclusion I can think of. I think the bars are smaller in circumference than a set of ‘real’ parallel or non-parallel bars and don’t have the flexibility or ‘give’ that real ones would have, the park ones are rather rigid.

    Hey, I was just happy to find out it wasn’t pre -arthritis, arthritis. lol.

  11. 12

    FAITH7

    @Smorgasbord#10 – Always a little ego pump when people can’t correctly guess your age and guess a lot younger – lol

    Sadly I have a ways to go before I get to retire. Some people who retire don’t know what to do with themselves, me ? – I have tons I could do. I do hope you are enjoying it.

    You say – “I will HAVE to exercise more. ”

    I know the first step in getting even a light exercise program together for yourself is always hard.
    You have to make it a routine and not let ‘other things’ deviate you from it. (Hard!!) – lol.
    Start slow and build up…walking, and brisk walking is a good start. Even this helps..a lot.

  12. 13

    Smorgasbord

    @FAITH7: #12

    Sadly I have a ways to go before I get to retire. Some people who retire don’t know what to do with themselves, me ? – I have tons I could do. I do hope you are enjoying it.

    When people ask me what I do since I retired, I tell them I do what I want to do, and if I don’t want to do anything, that’s what I do.

    There is a really nice bike trail a short bike ride from me, and I have been on it. I have a Total Gym, and it is a great exercise machine for about $200, but there isn’t anybody at home to ENCOURAGE me to get on it. I intend to do more than I have been. I’m one of those who will work myself to death for others, but don’t do much for myself.

    I just moved to another town, and when I get more involved in the community, I should be FORCED to get more exercise than I am now. I also very seldom take elevators. I usually only have to go up 2-4 floors.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *