What will Rush Limbaugh’s legacy be: Footnote or Patriot? Now is his time to decide…

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I’ve been listening to Rush Limbaugh since about 1992. Although he claims to be right 99.8% of the time or something like that, I find that I only agree with him about 97% of the time.

I’ve listened with great interest as he has eloquently exposed the left’s perniciousness in situations where I saw nothing sinister at all. More times than I can count I listened to the news or read a paper and simply took what they said at face value. Then I would listen to Rush talk about the exact same event and discuss the media’s coverage of it and like Russell Crowe’s John Nash in A Beautiful Mind he would lay out in great specificity what was really going on. He is as skilled at revealing the underlying machinations of the left and the media (the same thing, really) as Nash was at solving codes.

At the same time, he has been equally successful in highlighting the hypocrisy of the GOP establishment’s embrace of big government and open borders.

For more than a quarter century I’ve listened to Rush trumpet the virtues of conservatism. For more than a quarter century I’ve listened to Rush proclaim that if Americans only had an articulate conservative champion to vote for they would and the nation would be saved. Now that the country has one in Ted Cruz – for the
first time in a generation, where’s
 Limbaugh?

I’ll tell you where he is… he’s sitting in his south Florida studio explaining why Donald Trump is so successful in outsmarting the pundits. Sure, he offers the requisite “Ted Cruz is a rock solid conservative” a couple of times a week, but he spends most of his time explaining why Trump seems to defy the odds that no one else would have a shot at.

It’s his show and he has every right to do exactly what he wants and say anything he wants. My question is however, does Rush Limbaugh want to be remembered as a political commentator who uses his microphone to poke fun at liberals and illuminate the folly of the ruling class, or does he actually want to be a hero? He can be one or he can be the other, but he can’t be both.

If he truly believes what he has been saying over the last 28 years then now is the time for him to put his microphone where his mouth is. I’ll take Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton, but Donald Trump doesn’t solve the problems that are undermining the country as we speak. Donald Trump will not end big government. Donald Trump is not a champion for individual freedom. Donald Trump is not an enemy of crony capitalism. Donald Trump is not a fan of separation of powers or limited government. Ted Cruz is all of those things and more.

At the end of the day, Donald Trump embodies many – but not all – of the things Rush Limbaugh has been railing against for the past quarter century. So the question is, does Rush really believe what he says or is he simply trying to sell advertising? Not that there’s anything inherently wrong with the latter. I love watching the Big Bang Theory, but not for one second do I think the actors on that show are going to give Stephen Hawking a run for his money on a physics quiz. And they don’t expect me to believe it, they’re actors, I know they’re acting and it makes for great entertainment for me and they make lots of money. Great setup.

But the Rush Limbaugh Show is not a Hollywood sitcom. People don’t listen to Rush to listen to fiction. They listen to see the left exposed and listen to the heartfelt commentary from someone who cares about the United States, who champions freedom and explains (with examples) how liberty and free markets make the world a much better place than socialism, communism and most of what came before the United States was born.

And so, people like me look at Rush today and wonder if his heart is really in it or is he like a union leader who plays to the base while enriching himself at their expense? Although our expense in this case is time rather than money.  We wonder if wrapping himself in the American flag and American values is simply a ploy to generate advertising dollars.

Right here, right now is where the tire hits the road. Donald Trump is well down the path to winning the GOP nomination. That might lead to a Trump or Clinton presidency. Neither would be good for the country nor for freedom… although a Clinton presidency would surely be worse. But we’re not there yet, and now is when the voice of Rush Limbaugh could actually make a difference. It won’t matter in the general because coming out of the conventions most minds are already made up, and the ones that aren’t are likely not listening to Rush.

This is not a call for Rush to savage Donald Trump. That’s not necessary. What is necessary however is to stop the with wall to wall “exposing” of the hypocrisy of the GOP establishment – which we all see – and the media’s duplicity as they prop up Trump only to knife him once the general campaign begins. What is necessary is for Rush to simply talk about how Trump doesn’t comport with most of the things he has championed for the last quarter century. To explain that Trump is an enemy of free markets, limited government and no fan of individual freedom. And explain why those things are important and why his posture on those ideas puts him closer to Barack Obama than they do to Ronald Reagan.

There are times in our lives when we are faced with real, consequential choices, and it’s up to us to us to decide what we want to leave behind when we’re gone. For 28 years Rush Limbaugh has eloquently stated the case that the United States is the greatest nation in the history of the world, our Constitution is possibly next to the Bible in importance in helping to improve the condition of man and that our free markets have driven more prosperity than the world has ever seen. He’s right… but the cancer of liberalism has put all of that at risk. The question is, a century from now, when people look back on Rush Limbaugh’s life, will they read about a political gadfly who entertained people between long commercial breaks or will they read about a patriot who helped the country survive the scourge of progressivism and helped bring about a conservative revolution that not only turned back the tide of big government, but unleashed the forces of freedom (both individual and markets) that ushered in a period of growth and prosperity unprecedented in all of human history?

That’s a choice Rush will have to make. Does he want to go down as a footnote in history or does he want to join the pantheon of giants who used their influence to make a difference as have Ben Franklin, J.P. Morgan and Milton Friedman?

The product of a military family, growing up in Naples, Italy and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and being stationed in Germany for two years while in the Army, Vince spent half of his first quarter century seeing the US from outside of its own borders. That perspective, along with a French wife and two decades as a struggling entrepreneur have only fueled an appreciation for freedom and the fundamental greatness of the gifts our forefathers left us.

38 Responses to “What will Rush Limbaugh’s legacy be: Footnote or Patriot? Now is his time to decide…”

  1. 1

    Arnold Falk

    “Donald Trump will not end big government. Donald Trump is not a champion for individual freedom. Donald Trump is not an enemy of crony capitalism. Donald Trump is not a fan of separation of powers or limited government. Ted Cruz is all of those things and more.”

    Sure, Ted Cruz espouses all those positions. He might even believe it. But we are in the case of “Fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me.” Except we’ve been fooled dozens of times. The GOP has NEVER managed to actually accomplish any progress – or even significant efforts – towards these goals, except perhaps arguably a period under Gingrich when a GOP-led Congress pushed through some reforms.

    Even more urgent than the whole “small government, gun rights etc” platform that the GOP has traditionally leaned on, are the issues of uncontrolled borders, Obamacare, tax reform, trade reform, and yes, Veterans Affairs reform. Those are things that Trump has expressed his priorities on, and I find that far more believable than anything Cruz or any GOP apparatchik will say.

    Remember something: Donald Trump is a highly experienced senior executive. As such, he knows the importance of hiring competent managers below him (the Cabinet) who are capable of making things happen. That is something very rare in Washington. One of the biggest complaints we have about the GOP is their inability to get things done. Cruz or Rubio will be more of the same. Trump might actually do it – it’s in his nature.

  2. 2

    Jim22

    I think it is not Limbaugh’s decision to make. He is a conservative and conservatism is in decline. History will write his legacy. If Conservatism is killed off he will be remembered as a failure – if at all.

  3. 3

    Tony Plank

    The hypocrisy of politics is not confined to conservatives, though I find it repugnant that conservatives can not denounce Trump. Sadly, it really is all about power.

    Limbaugh will scarcely be remembered outside of media circles. Within his milieu, however, he was a game-changer and the effects, both good and bad, will outlast him. The tsunami he unleashed on old-media will not be soon forgotten.

    https://tonyplank.wordpress.com/

  4. 4

    Redteam

    @Arnold Falk: Arnold, I agree with almost all you said. While reading Vince’s comments, my thoughts were running along the lines of what you’re saying. (Just let me make this statement and then I’ll leave it alone and cover the other points) “I could support Ted Cruz on many of his points, the one point I can’t agree on him about his ‘expertise’ on the Constitution. If he is really a Constitutionalist, he would not be running because he is not eligible, not being a ‘natural born citizen’. ” end of that comment. I do not listen to Rush anymore, mostly because he’s not on radio locally so I have to track down a place to hear his comments, but I did listen to him regularly from about 92 to 05. I almost always agree with him. That’s why I was a little disappointed that he seemed to be favoring Cruz over Trump. While Cruz has made some stands, when it gets down to it, he is still the ‘same old-same old’. We keep electing Repubs to go to Washington and they just throw in with the crowd and the only change is a continued downhill slide. I live in Louisiana and we recently had a governor’s election where we had establishment Repub Vitter running against Dimocrat Edwards(not related to Edwin Edwards). Louisiana has been going Repub in almost all elections for many years now, but Vitter was such a huge disappointment as Senator (throwing in with the Dims) that the people in La decided if we were going to have a Dim in practice, that they would just elect one so they elected Edwards. At any rate, the changes we need in Washington are something that Trump can get done. Cruz can not. Will Trump build a wall? Yes. Do we need a wall? Yes. Would Cruz build that same wall? Not in my opinion.
    There is much that can be done to get some businesses going in the US without ‘destroying’ free trade in the world. Trump can get that done. Cruz wouldn’t know where to start.
    Vince said: ” What is necessary however is to stop the with wall to wall “exposing” of the hypocrisy of the GOP establishment” Romney said yesterday that he would not vote for Trump under any circumstances. That is a man that he basically begged to endorse him just 4 years ago. Is Romney’s judgment that bad? Did he not know who/what Trump was when he courted him? Sure he knew. Why is he knifing him now? Because he sees/hopes for an open convention where he would be drafted so that he could then lose to Hiillary. The US has already shown that they would vote for anyone other than Romney. Romney even threw in the towel in the last election, basically not even campaigning the last month before the election.
    Yes, if we elect the correct person, the US can begin to make a comeback, start getting people back to work, stop advancing the socialist agenda toward the destruction of the country. That correct person is not Ted Cruz.

  5. 5

    Richard Wheeler

    Very well written Vince. For.one of the rare times in Rush’s career he’s not sure what to do—he doesn’t wanna endorse the wrong guy–the loser.—bad for his huge image.
    He’ll wait

  6. 6

    Redteam

    @Richard Wheeler:

    he doesn’t wanna endorse the wrong guy–the loser.

    Kinda like you and Jimbo Webb? Guess you’re a little distraught since he came out for Trump. Geez, maybe having a harem keeps his brain clear.

  7. 7

    Redteam

    @Tony Plank:

    though I find it repugnant that conservatives can not denounce Trump.

    Why would denouncing Trump be a ‘conservative’ move? What do the ‘conservatives’ want that Trump is opposed to?

  8. 8

    Tony Plank

    @Redteam:

    You are just trolling me. I know this. But I am a sucker.

    This is just off the top of my head, so I’m not trying to be comprehensive here: Donations to Clinton campaigns and other Democrats, support for government provided healthcare, support for late-term abortion, support for abortion generally, severe criticism of W., serious well documented character issues

    And if you are going to tell me about his policy shifts, I almost put unrepentant flip-flopping on that list (which conservatives have blustered about extensively in the past).

    I don’t see anything very conservative about this guy other than pandering to xenophobes.

    https://tonyplank.wordpress.com/

  9. 9

    Redteam

    @Tony Plank:

    You are just trolling me. I know this. But I am a sucker.

    Sorry you feel that way, but I’m not just an infrequent visitor here to ‘troll’. I’ve been commenting on this blog regularly for quite some time. I take everyone seriously until they prove that they’re not.

    : Donations to Clinton campaigns and other Democrats, support for government provided healthcare, support for late-term abortion,

    I certainly agree with you on those things. I have never claimed to be a big fan of Trump, I’ve only gotten to the point of ‘probably’ will vote for him because there is no one, certainly no conservatives, left in the race. First neither Cruz or Rubio are eligible, not natural born citizens, but that aside, I know of nothing either of them have done that would verify their bona fides as conservative. Rubio has never been conservative, having been a member of the gang of eight, the very epitome of open border and amnesty for illegals. While Cruz has a little more going for him, at least he occasionally pretends to be conservative, but when it gets to where the rubber meets the road, he caves and joins the back room boys.

    severe criticism of W.

    I have a real problem with that, but even worse, I have a big problem with Bush admitting (falsely) that he lied about WMD’s (fabricated evidence). I know, and anyone that has looked into it, knows that there were then and still are now, WMD’s in Iraq. So Bush is lying now and if he lies about himself, how can you be critical of someone else lying about Bush. I supported the invasion of Iraq. Bush left it in relatively good shape, Obama turned it into a full fledged disaster.

    And if you are going to tell me about his policy shifts,

    I have no problem with people changing their minds. Experience is no good if you don’t use it to refine your methods and objectives. Trump has many years of doing business throughout the world and I would be disappointed if he were still doing things as he did 30 years ago without using the benefit of what he’s learned over those years.
    If you can think of some issue that either Rubio or Cruz is rock solid conservative on, I’d like to know what it is.
    What do you personally think of the fraud on his constituents that Rubio is committing based on repeatedly missing Senate votes on critical items where his vote may be necessary to send a message? Whether the votes are critical or not, if he’s not representing his constituents, he should resign the seat. It’ll be vacated after his next election anyhow, surely they won’t re elect him.

    Again, sorry if you think I’m ‘trolling’ but I try to put some thought into my communications.

  10. 10

    Tony Plank

    @Redteam:

    Hahaha. Cool. I’ve been trolled a lot lately. That was indeed unfair of me!

    I think we are in complete agreement with respect to what you said about Trump….right up to the vote for him part. He is is not worthy of trust of the office.

    This is where I am truly unrealistic I suppose: I want to vote for someone that I don’t find morally repugnant. I consider myself a principled non-voter. I keep hoping and dreaming this will change, but Americans continue to obsessively vote for Democrats and Republicans leaving me zero options.

    I suppose that I should add on Trump, that while I don’t like people changing their minds, there is a difference between a reasoned change (which is healthy) and radical shifts over short periods of time. I think he is in the latter camp.

    I agree with you on Rubio. The GOP should be ashamed. As should the Democrats.

    https://tonyplank.wordpress.com/

  11. 11

    Redteam

    @Tony Plank:

    This is where I am truly unrealistic I suppose: I want to vote for someone that I don’t find morally repugnant. I consider myself a principled non-voter. I

    I share that view. I just commented a couple days ago that I’m likely to not vote in the presidential election for the first time since I’ve been eligible. But that I live in Louisiana and they will vote heavily Trump, so it won’t matter.

    I have a problem identifying anyone as ‘conservative’ in this presidential race. Trump resonates with the people because he is saying what they want to hear someone saying; “the Pied Piper” syndrome. The people are clearly not interested in what Hillary and Rubio and Cruz are saying. Same old, same old.

    I bookmarked your blog site and will read some of the articles on it.

  12. 12

    Tony Plank

    @Redteam:

    Pied Piper is a good way to express it. I may steal that.

    Sadly, I parted ways with the GOP a very long time ago. Went Libertarian for a while. Finally, decided I couldn’t in good conscious support anyone on the horizon. As a total political junky, this makes me sad.

    Hope you enjoy my blog. I’m just getting spun back up after a 10 year hiatus. I think my older stuff is better on average thus far. I’m doing it for the comment conversations though…that is what I enjoy. I’ve got a few of my old regulars back, and they are intelligent interesting folk from all over the political spectrum.

    https://tonyplank.wordpress.com/

  13. 13

    Arnold Falk

    @Tony Plank:

    If you agree completely with a candidate, you are a lemming. No intelligent person going to the polls will ever have the perfect candidate. You have to vote for the candidate that fits CLOSEST to your issues of concern, taking into account both priority (I consider border security to be far more important than abortion, for example), and the likelihood that your candidate has a chance to win – face it, a vote for the Constitution Party or the Green Party is a wasted vote, in our system.

  14. 14

    Redteam

    @Tony Plank: tried to comment on your site but it required sign in by wordpress where I use a different name.. Tried to register with wordpress but it wants to charge me to set up a blog if I register with them. I have used Redteam on WordPress but for some reason it’s not hospitable. I’ll keep trying to figure it out.

  15. 18

    Nanny G

    @Tony Plank: This is just off the top of my head, so I’m not trying to be comprehensive here: Donations to Clinton campaigns and other Democrats, support for government provided healthcare, support for late-term abortion, support for abortion generally

    Generally, Tony, I appreciate your comments as well reasoned.
    But you must admit that these examples, just off the top, are straight out of Rubio/Cruz/Romney talking points and NOT accurate as to Mr. Trump’s stands today.
    Are you a Christian?
    If, so, you are probably aware of the Apostle Paul’s conversion ”on the road to Damascus.”
    If not, allow me to enlighten you:
    Paul was a strong believer in Judaism.
    he saw the early Christian movement, after Jesus’ death and resurrection and saw red.
    He personally went out and tried to round up Christians so they could be prosecuted by the Jewish Judges and Roman governor.
    While he was seeking a few more Christians, following a lead that they were in Damascus, he heard God from heaven asking him, ”Saul, why are you persecuting me?”
    As if blind, scales fell from his eyes and Saul saw the truth, that these Christians had God’s favor while the Jewish leaders had lost it.
    Saul, became Paul and a hugely influential Christian.
    He changed 180 degrees.
    Naturally, a few Christians were suspicious that he was a new man.
    But other Apostles vouched for Paul.
    Eventually he became a most trusted and beloved Christian in the entire congregations of the earth at that time.

    So, my point?
    People can and do change.

    Donations to Clinton campaigns and other Democrats

    Mr. Trump supported a lot of candidates back when Hillary was running for Senate.
    She was but one of many of both parties.

    support for government provided healthcare

    Mr. Trump has published an entire reform of health care, including the repeal of ACA (ObamaCare.)

    https://www.donaldjtrump.com/positions/healthcare-reform
    *Completely repeal Obamacare. Our elected representatives must eliminate the individual mandate. No person should be required to buy insurance unless he or she wants to.
    *Modify existing law that inhibits the sale of health insurance across state lines. As long as the plan purchased complies with state requirements, any vendor ought to be able to offer insurance in any state. By allowing full competition in this market, insurance costs will go down and consumer satisfaction will go up.
    *Allow individuals to fully deduct health insurance premium payments from their tax returns under the current tax system.
    *Allow individuals to use Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). Contributions into HSAs should be tax-free and should be allowed to accumulate. These accounts would become part of the estate of the individual and could be passed on to heirs without fear of any death penalty.
    *Require price transparency from all healthcare providers, especially doctors and healthcare organizations like clinics and hospitals. Individuals should be able to shop to find the best prices for procedures, exams or any other medical-related procedure.
    *Remove barriers to entry into free markets for drug providers that offer safe, reliable and cheaper products. Congress will need the courage to step away from the special interests.
    *Providing healthcare to illegal immigrants costs us some $11 billion annually. If we were to simply enforce the current immigration laws and restrict the unbridled granting of visas to this country, we could relieve healthcare cost pressures on state and local governments.

    Nothing even remotely like the government healthcare Obama set up.

    support for late-term abortion, support for abortion generally

    This brings me to that Road to Damascus moment.
    Mr. Trump knows a man who didn’t want his wife to keep her pregnancy.
    But she did keep it.
    After the baby was born, the man fell in love with the child, and had a 180 change on the whole idea of abortion…..his conversation with Donald Trump led to Mr. Trump’s 180 on abortion as well.
    He never looked back.

    That said, abortion is LEGAL in this country.
    A president is NOT a SCOTUS.
    He cannot force abortion to become illegal.
    He can use the ”bully pulpit” to try to discourage it.
    He can discourage it through defunding Planned Parenthood unless it quits being an abortion factory.
    Mr. Trump will do that.
    With over 60 million abortions since Roe V Wade abortion is hardly rare. …..
    In 2012, 700,000 abortions in 49 states.
    730,322 abortions were reported to CDC for 2011 from all 50 states.
    765,651 abortions were reported to CDC for 2010.

  16. 19

    Tony Plank

    @Redteam:

    I am most unimpressed with how WordPress handles its comments. I definitely want to make some changes once I get other aspects of the blogging back up to speed. I’m thinking about using Reddit, but that has pros and cons as well.

    I know one person just fills in the blanks and never logs in. As admin, I never see the email if you do it like that. The email, best I can tell, is only used for reply notifications.

    If you can’t resolve it satisfactorly, let me know and I will contact WordPress…haven’t used their tech support yet, but who knows.

  17. 20

    Tony Plank

    @Arnold Falk:

    If you agree completely with a candidate, you are a lemming. No intelligent person going to the polls will ever have the perfect candidate.

    I agree completely.

    You have to vote for the candidate that fits CLOSEST to your issues of concern, taking into account both priority (I consider border security to be far more important than abortion, for example), and the likelihood that your candidate has a chance to win

    I have two reasons I disagree with you here.

    There are generally a few issues, for most people I think, that are just automatic disqualifiers. For me this historically included abortion, but I’ve softened on that lately. The one that continues to be my area of primary concern is civil liberties. I am utterly convinced that the continuing domination of strong>Two-Party Hall© is resulting in a systematic destruction of the natural rights underpinnings of American law.

    Second, the chances to win portion of the balancing you describe is a trap. This is part of why we are stuck in this artificial single axis political belief structure that is tearing us apart. More people need to step out there and vote for the candidate most likely to affect the change they desire.

    – face it, a vote for the Constitution Party or the Green Party is a wasted vote, in our system.

    Now this is the strongest area of disagreement I have with that post. I would argue that the only sure way to waste your vote is to vote for the GOP or Democrats. We have decades of evidence that doing so will result in very little change. If less people thought like this, even the candidates of Two-Party Hall© would have to take notice because as rigged as our system is, they still need our votes.

    https://tonyplank.wordpress.com

  18. 21

    Tony Plank

    @Nanny G:

    Generally, Tony, I appreciate your comments as well reasoned.

    Thank you. I try.

    But you must admit that these examples, just off the top, are straight out of Rubio/Cruz/Romney talking points and NOT accurate as to Mr. Trump’s stands today.

    I agree completely. But, it does give one a proper duty to consider the candidates likely commitment to these issues if they are important to you.

    Are you a Christian?
    If, so, you are probably aware of the Apostle Paul’s conversion

    Yes, I am. I’m a Restoration Movement inspired anti-denominational type. Hmmm. Kind of like my politics. 😀 And yes, I’m even a Sunday School teacher-well, not at the moment. But pretty well studied as far as lay people go. I hesitate to talk more about me, but the short version is that I do not believe Jesus’ teaching compels our support of any particular partisan platform.

    I do believe people can change and you have articulated that potential very well. But, I can only judge what I see and his words are those of a politician who seems to be bending to the political winds. His words are filled with hate and hubris we haven’t seen since George Wallace.

    If Trump has convinced you that he is something different than that, I understand. You may well be different than others, but looking at the Trump support among Conservatives (capital C), I am hearing a lot of what sounds like hard work to justify supporting the eventual candidate.

    I’m sorry I don’t have time to respond more fully…my weekends are pretty full these days.

    https://tonyplank.wordpress.com

  19. 23

    Redteam

    @Richard Wheeler: I make it up? Give me the quote from 6 where I said Webb ‘endorsed’ Trump? And RT is the one making it up as he goes along?
    But, it’s Saturday, I’m sure you’ve got your hound dog loaded up, your rainbow flag and Chaps and are headed for the Parade? Tell the gang hi for us.

  20. 24

    Nanny G

    @Richard Wheeler: Correct, it was a personal statement of his own potential (no promises!) to vote for Trump.
    Sort of like David Duke did.

    EVERYONE has the right to vote (if they are eligible to) for whomsoever they wish.

    And, they can pick a candidate for WHATEVER reason they wish.

    Here’s what Jim Webb tweeted:

    .@JimWebbUSA: No, I would not vote for @HillaryClinton… ‘I’m not sure yet’ on @realDonaldTrump
    5:56 AM – 4 Mar 2016

  21. 25

    Randy

    I do not remember when Rush has actually endorsed a GOP candidate during the primary season. I know he holds his nose and votes for the candidate least likely to screw up the country more than it is. I do read the comments on his web site and he has described in depth how each candidate is managing his campaign. He likely spends more time on Trump due to the uniqueness of trumps campaign verses the others. I frankly do not believe he cares how he is recorded in history!

  22. 30

    Ditto

    @Arnold Falk:

    … Except we’ve been fooled dozens of times….

    Dozens of times? I think you’re seriously under-reporting the number of times “we’ve been fooled.” by a great magnitude.

    @Vince

    I think you’re jumping to an unsupported and biased conclusion regarding Rush & Trump. Yes, Rush is defending front runner Trump who is under sustained attacks by Dems, the MSM and the equally “progressive” GOPe. As I see it, this is Rush following Ronald Reagan’s commandment, ‘not to attack fellow Republicans’. Limbaugh has not come out and endorsed Trump nor Cruz.

    I too would rather a conservative like Cruz win the nomination. There are however two issues that hurt Cruz as a presumptive GOP nominee:

    (1) is the ‘birther’ issue that the Democrat’s nominee (whoever she is,) will not hesitate to bring to the national forefront. (Hillary did it on Obama, it is ludicrous to think she wont do the same for Cruz). I honestly think Trump was doing Cruz a favor by bringing it up now, and the GOP & Cruz would be wise to have that resolved now rather than later.

    (2) “Elect-ability” in the General Election: Let’s face facts. The ‘birther’ issue aside, Cruz would be hard pressed to get the support of moderates and cross-over voters in the General Election especially with the MSM continually decrying him as a radical far-right extremist. They would more likely consider the Democrat nominee as the “lessor of evils” or they will not vote at all. This gives the Democrats the advantage.

    Rubio would be a total disaster, he too has an even worse ‘birther’ problem, and I seriously doubt enough GOP voters would vote for him.

    Trump, (on the other hand) is drawing in dissatisfied voters from all over the spectrum which has been the dream of the GOP for decades. I do not agree with the (apparent) consensus of FA moderators, that Trump would be as bad a President as they seem to want us to believe. Trump is a loudmouth but he is not stupid, and he is all about showing himself as a pillar of success. And hasn’t the GOP always told us a rising tide lifts all boats?

    Look folks, I would prefer a President Cruz over a President Trump, but I just don’t see it as a reality in the General Election. I think the winning ticket is Trump/Cruz to stabilize the nation, return jobs, build the economy. And then follow a successful Trump administration with a better known and respected Cruz for President run.

    That’s my two cents.

  23. 31

    Richard Wheeler

    @Ditto: “lying Ted” would never accept a Trump V.P. offer.
    Donald’s made a lot of enemies within The Party.—possibly Carson would take V.P.
    Fox poll has Kasich up 5% in Ohio–Kasich /Rubio best chance of beating HRC.

  24. 34

    Arnold Falk

    @Ditto:

    There are however two issues that hurt Cruz as a presumptive GOP nominee:

    There is another problem with him – he’s too much of a social conservative in the Southern Baptist vein. I’m a conservative – in things that matter like fiscal policy and constitutional limits. But I don’t want a nominee who will spend a lot of time on lost causes like abortion or gay marriage.

  25. 35

    Ditto

    @ <a href="http://www.floppingaces.net/2016/03/04/what-will-rush-limbaughs-legacy-be-footnote-or-patriot-now-is-his-time-to-decide/#comment-495525">Richard Wheeler:

    “lying Ted” would never accept a Trump V.P. offer.

    Ronald Reagan/George H. W. Bush I remember the same sort of claim was made about that pair up, which won two elections and resulted in one term for Bush the elder. The voters were also told by the MSM that Regan couldn’t win the nomination.

    @Richard Wheeler:

    Current Delegate Count (1237 needed to win)
    Trump 446, Cruz 347, Rubio 151, Kasich 58, Carson 8

    Kasich +Rubio 209 Nope, not seeing a path there. The only possible way the Republican establishment RINO candidates could win is if the GOPe leadership forces a brokered convention, (Which is exactly what Rubio and Kasich are holding out for.) There has never been a brokered nomination, and there never will unless the GOPe wishes to do away with the Republican Party and go the way of the Whigs. A brokered convention will be the final nail in the coffin for the Republican Party. If that happens, the conservative base will not vote for for the brokered nominees and will either : (1) Stay home. (2) Vote Trump in an independent run. (3) Leave the Republican Party and vote third party. (4) Result in a Republican base revolution against the GOPe. The GOPe gains nothing by enraging their voters by holding a brokered convention nomination. A brokered GOP convention only helps the Democrat candidate, and will be political suicide for the GOPe. (Which is likely why so many Dmeocrats and the MSM are slavering at the chops for a brokered GOP nomination.)

    Fox poll…

    Cherry picking polls proves nothing. Fox polls are irrelevant. Fox only supports the GOPe candidates and therefore their polling is suspect.

    Most current polling shows Trump ahead of Kasich in Ohio and Rubio in Florida.

    @Richard Wheeler:

    BEST chance of beating HRC is my DREAM TEAM

    Oh, then you support Trump.

    @Arnold Falk:

    There is another problem with him – he’s too much of a social conservative in the Southern Baptist vein.

    That pretty much goes without saying. Which is why Trump carefully crafted his response on Planned Parenthood.

  26. 36

    Richard Wheeler

    @Ditto: Couple of things– If there’s a brokered convention it will be brought about by the primary voters– not the establishment Trump won’t have 50% of the delegates when they get to Cleveland—we’ll know this Tues—if Kasich wins Ohio it will be brokered—3 in with Rubio out after losing Fla. If Trump wins Ohio he’s got the nom as Cruz can’t hang in alone.

    Reagan never DEGRADED Bush like Trump has degraded “lying Ted”–he won’t take Veep if Trump offers–think it will be Carson
    Kasich/Rubio will bring Indies, Latinos and the entire Repub Party–easy win over HRC.
    Trump will struggle in G.E. with negs as high as HRC.

    btw–If you guys are dumping Fox what the hell is left?

  27. 38

    Ditto

    @Richard Wheeler:

    If there’s a brokered convention it will be brought about by the primary voters– not the establishment

    Partially true. It would however have been brought about by the establishment candidates, (Rubio and/or Kasich) refusing to concede that they have no possible path to gain enough delegates outright to win. Their decision to stay in the race in order to force a brokered convention will not set well with the Republican base.

    Point in logic is that; the longer those two stay in, the higher the likelihood that establishment leaning voters will have second thoughts about pushing the party into a brokered convention. As Rubio and Kasich’s path to a simple 1st delegate vote win have evaporated, remaining voters will tend to gravitate towards one of the leading candidates. I suspect many of these GOPe voters will decide instead to vote for one of the two stronger candidates who have a greater chance to win. (If you think that those establishment voters would support the more hated Cruz, there’s something wrong with your thinking.) Now, let’s look at the numbers:

    Total Delegates are 2472
    Delegates needed to win nomination 1237 needed to win
    Current Remaining Delegate Count 1658

    Trump 446, Cruz 347, Rubio 151, Kasich 58, Carson 8

    Trump needs 791 more delegates to win (Could possibly happen)
    Cruz needs 890 more delegates to win (Could possibly happen)
    Rubio needs 1086 more delegates to win (Not going to happen)
    Kasich needs 1179 more delegates to win (Not going to happen)

    Carson could tomorrow tell his delegates to vote for Trump giving Trump 8 more delegates.

    Florida (A winner take all state with 99 delegates) Polls:
    Quinnipiac Trump 44%, Rubio 22%, Cruz 18% Kasich 8%
    Politico: Trump 36%, Rubio 27%, Cruz 19%, Kasich 10%
    CNN/ORC: Trump 40%, Rubio 24%, Cruz 19%, Kasich 5%
    Monmouth: Trump 38%, Rubio 30%, Cruz 17%, Kasich 10%
    (Note: 66% of voters believe Rubio should drop out if he loses his home state Florida)
    .
    That very likely win would give Trump 545 delegates with 692 left to win. (That’s what Rubio gets for flip-flopping on Amnesty.)

    Now let’s look at Ohio (99 delegates, winner take all) polls:
    Florida (A winner take all state with 99 delegates) Polls:
    Quinnipiac Trump 38%, Kasich 26%, Rubio 21%, Cruz 13% ,Carson 5%
    PPP: Trump 38%, Kasich 32%, Cruz 15%, Rubio 5%
    CNN/ORC: Trump 41%, Kasich 35%, Cruz 16%, Rubio 9%
    (Note: Kasich has already said he will drop out if he loses Ohio. 71% of voters believe Kasich should drop out if he loses his home state Ohio.)

    Ohio will likely be close, but if Kasich loses, that gives Trump 99 more delegates. That would give Trump 644 delegates with 593 left to win. That’s over halfway. with Cruz still at 347 and Rubio at a meager 151 and if he keeps his promise Kasich dropping out makes it a three man race.

    @Richard Wheeler:

    btw–If you guys are dumping Fox what the hell is left?

    Fox is still the leader in television news, but they have lost nearly half their Republican viewership since dropping their “Conservative” facade. (If I were Rodger Ailes, I would be sweating bullets at the next stockholder’s meeting.. FOX is down to 2013 levels).

    Why would you think us internet savvy FA Conservatives only rely on Fox for our news? You are so behind the times.

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